Lateral or Medial Epicondylitis

Lateral or Medial Epicondylitis

Symptoms of epicondylitis are often treated with injections, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAID’s), or repeatedly icing the area. These methods are used as an immediate and temporary pain relief, but aren’t permanent solutions to stubborn elbow pain.

As an alternative, Cold Laser Therapy targets the source of the pain by stimulating the cells of damaged tissue to increase the speed of healing. In addition, Cold Laser Therapy is a permanent solution that often requires few ongoing maintenance treatments, if any at all. Not only is it effective for the long term, but the increase of blood flow can also cause short term pain relief directly following a treatment.

Cold Laser Therapy: Epicondylitis Treatment

Cold Laser Therapy often reduces recovery time from sport injuries by 50%, allowing you to regain mobility and eliminate pain.

Cold Laser Therapy: Epicondylitis Treatment - Step 1 Red Light Pad

Cold Laser Therapy: Epicondylitis Treatment – Step 1 Red Light Pad

Cold Laser Therapy: Epicondylitis Treatment - Step 2 Infrared Light Pad

Cold Laser Therapy: Epicondylitis Treatment – Step 2 Infrared Light Pad

Cold Laser Therapy: Epicondylitis Treatment - Step 3 Infrared Wand

Cold Laser Therapy: Epicondylitis Treatment – Step 3 Infrared Wand

Regenerates Muscle Tissue:
Transfers light energy to the affected cells of muscle, regenerating and strengthening damaged muscle tissue to prevent future injury.

Decreases Inflammation:
Speeds up the body's natural inflammation phase and induces the repair phase of healing.

Removes Internal Scar Tissue:
Inhibits and removes Internal Scar Tissue that naturally forms from injury or repetitive strain, causing discomfort and a delay in healing.

Nerve Regeneration:
Helps damaged nerves to recover by growing the neural network and repairing vital insulation around the nerve.

Stimulates Blood Flow:
Increases the delivery of oxygen and nutrients required for healing of the affected cells.

Visit our Cold Laser Therapy page to learn more about how the treatment works.
About Epicondylitis

What is Epicondylitis?

Epicondylitis is a common medical term for a type of inflammation and pain located at the elbow. Furthermore, this condition is caused by repetitive stress or overuse of the muscles and tendons attaching to the elbow joint. Generally speaking, pain is typically caused from repeated contraction of the muscles that help control the movement of your elbow, hand and wrist.

The two most commonly known types of epicondylitis are medial (golfer’s elbow) and lateral (tennis elbow). Comparatively, these conditions are quite similar, but they refer to different areas of the elbow and forearm and are caused by different movements.

Medial epicondylitis is caused by straining the forearm muscles that attach to the inside of the elbow. Similarly, lateral epicondylitis refers to straining the forearm muscles that attach to the outside of the elbow. In simplified terms, one is more related to a forehand motion while the other more to a backhand motion. In fact, it is entirely possible that a golfer may have tennis elbow and a tennis player may have golfer’s elbow.

Common Symptoms

  • Pain and tenderness around the elbow, may be constant or aggravated only with certain actions or movements
  • Pain into the forearm
  • Weakness of the hand/wrist
  • Stiffness of the elbow
  • Numbness and tingling of the forearm, hand and/or fingers

Epicondylitis frequently affects golfers and tennis players. Additionally, it affects other individuals who participate in sports, work, or leisure activities that include highly repetitive elbow, arm, wrist, and hand motions. Generally, epicondylitis is common in those who repetitively grip something rather tightly.

In sports this may include diverse groups like baseball players, weight lifters, table-tennis players and bowlers. Similarly, carpenters, movers, mechanics, landscapers, gardeners, cooks, and house or office cleaners may suffer from these pains. For some individuals  typing or writing can also trigger epicondylitis.