Hip osteoarthritis

Hip osteoarthritis

Hip osteoarthritis can be a very debilitating form of osteoarthritis, and is most often treated with painkillers. Although painkillers can be excellent at temporarily reducing pain, they do not work to solve the cause of the discomfort. In addition, many people who treat hip osteoarthritis with painkillers feel that the pain relief is not as effective after long term use. And not to mention the risk of negative side effects that painkillers can cause.

Alternatively, Cold Laser Therapy is a hip osteoarthritis treatment that actually works to heal the source of pain. It transfers light energy into affected cells to stimulate the body’s own, natural, healing process. This means that the treatment is completely safe, and there are no risks of negative side effects.

Cold Laser Therapy: Hip Osteoarthritis Treatment
Cold Laser Therapy Hip Osteoarthritis Treatment: Step 1

Cold Laser Therapy Hip Osteoarthritis Treatment: Step 1

Cold Laser Therapy Hip Osteoarthritis Treatment: Step 2

Cold Laser Therapy Hip Osteoarthritis Treatment: Step 2

Cold Laser Therapy Hip Osteoarthritis Treatment: Step 2

Cold Laser Therapy Hip Osteoarthritis Treatment: Step 2

Activates Cartilage Production:
Promotes the natural cartilage growth process by increasing the production of cellular energy (ATP).

Accelerates Bone Repair:
Stimulates the bone cells to replicate and produce new healthy bone tissue.

Decreases Inflammation:
Speeds up the body's natural inflammation phase and induces the repair phase of healing.

Stimulates Blood Flow:
Increases the delivery of oxygen and nutrients required for healing of the affected cells.

Visit our Cold Laser Therapy Page to learn more about how the treatment works.
About Hip Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is progressive degeneration from wear and tear of the joints, resulting in the breakdown of cartilage (natural joint lubricant) and joint surfaces. These processes result in structural changes of the affected joints (such as bone spurs) that can usually be seen on X-rays.

A slow, gradual onset of symptoms may occur as the joint changes, becomes more inflamed and as the surrounding muscles, ligaments and tendons compensate for the joint changes by overworking/straining. The combination of symptoms one may experience can become extremely uncomfortable and sometimes debilitating.

Common Symptoms

  • Pain in the joint, may increase with activity and decrease with rest
  • Limited range of motion
  • Stiffness, may be worse in the morning or after periods of rest
  • May be affected by weather changes
  • Surrounding muscles may be tender to touch
  • Grinding or crunching (crepitus) sensation with movement

The degenerative process takes a long time to develop and sometimes may not be painful unless aggravated by trauma or overuse of the area. It is also important to know that the degree of pain or discomfort does not directly translate to the degree of degeneration; sometimes a very painful hip may not be have a large degree of degeneration, or a severely degenerated hip may have little to no pain. Sometimes pain is experienced in other areas such as the thigh, knees, groin or buttocks.